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Rocky Mountain Hiking Like The Loud House

Rocky Mountain Hiking Like The Loud House

The Colorado Rockies are a pretty stunning site any time of the year. Summer visits are especially beautiful, with the abundance of outdoor adventures, scenic hikes, and picturesque vistas. Tonight, you can get a look at The Loud House family vacation to the Colorado Rockies on Nickelodeon. It might inspire you to make your own mountain trek to Colorado! We’ve made a list of some fantastic hiking options in and around Rocky Mountain National Park that make use of the scenic views in the best way possible—they’re great for all ages. We’ve included a list of campgrounds and a packing guide to keep you safe and prepared for your journey into the Great Outdoors. We’ve also got an exclusive clip of the family’s trip to the Rockies here. Check it out and start planning your own adventure! 

Family-Friendly Hiking in the Colorado Rockies

Bear Lake Road

At the end of Bear Lake Road, you’ll find a parking lot that leads to numerous trails—you’ll actually find nine hikes from Bear Lake Trailhead alone! Nymph Lake and Bear Lake are both around one mile roundtrip; Bear Lake Trail will actually lead you all the way around the lake (the incline on this hike is minimal and may be the best for small children). The hike to Dream Lake is a little over two miles roundtrip, and you can also continue to Emerald Lake for a roundtrip total of under four miles.

Emerald Lake (©Chris Abney)
Emerald Lake (©Chris Abney)

Glacier Gorge Junction

Enjoy the waterfalls without the terrifying ride down! Glacier Gorge Junction’s Trailhead leads to five different hikes, the least strenuous being Alberta Falls, with a roundtrip distance of under two miles.

Alberta Falls (©Alex Boyd)
Alberta Falls (©Alex Boyd)

Sprague Lake

If you’re looking for an easy hike that’s perfect for younger children, the Sprague Lake Trail is a great option. The trail loop is under a mile with a minimal incline and fairly basic terrain. It’s a great trail for taking it easy and enjoying the sights.

Sprague Lake (©Sonja Wilkinson)
Sprague Lake (©Sonja Wilkinson)

Camping at Rocky Mountain National Park

One of the best parts about visiting a national park with an RV is that there is typically an abundance of camping options onsite. If you’re hoping to camp within the park, check here for options—there are actually five campgrounds within Rocky Mountain National Park; however, not all of them provide the same types of accommodations for different vehicles, and they may not provide the same amenities. If you’re looking for a campground with the usual bells and whistles, Estes Park / Rocky Mountain National Park KOA Holiday is not too far from the park and provides all the comforts you can expect from a KOA.

The Loud House (Courtesy Nickelodeon)
The Loud House (Courtesy Nickelodeon)

What to Bring

Rocky Mountain National Park is home to some of the most stunning natural scenery that North America has to offer. From alpine tundras to lush forests, the park has it all. If you’re planning to spend your summer exploring the park’s many hiking trails, you’ll need to make sure you’re properly prepared. Even for a shorter hike, it’s best to pack accordingly in case of emergencies!

  • A backpack: You’ll want a sturdy backpack with plenty of room to hold all of your other hiking essentials.
  • Water: The park’s high altitude means you’ll need to drink more water than you would at lower elevations. Bring at least two liters of water per person, and consider bringing a water filter or purification tablets in case you need to refill from a natural water source.
  • Snacks: Hiking can be a strenuous activity, and you’ll need to keep your energy up. Bring high-protein snacks like jerky, nuts, and energy bars.
  • Sun protection: The sun can be intense at high altitudes, so don’t forget your sunscreen, sunglasses, and hat.
  • Appropriate clothing: The weather in the Rockies can be unpredictable, even in the summer. Bring layers that you can easily add or remove as needed. You’ll also need sturdy and comfortable hiking boots and moisture-wicking clothing to keep you dry and comfortable.
  • Navigation tools: While the park’s trails are clearly marked, it’s always a good idea to bring a map, compass, or GPS device to help you stay on track.
  • A first aid kit: Accidents can happen, so bring a basic first aid kit with bandages, gauze, antiseptic wipes, and any prescription medications you may need. A snake bite kit is also a great way to stay prepared!
  • Insect repellent: The park is home to mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting insects. Bring a strong insect repellent to keep them at bay.
  • Bear spray: While the necessity for bear spray is debatable online, when it comes to bears, it’s better to be safe than sorry!
Hiking Essentials (©Andrew Ly)
Hiking Essentials (©Andrew Ly)
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